1. COVID-19 Scan for Nov 06, 2020 | CIDRAP  CIDRAP
  2. Covid-19 infection rate appears to be slowing down – ONS  expressandstar.com
  3. Rise in new coronavirus cases in England 'appears to have stabilised'  Mirror Online
  4. Lung damage found in COVID dead may shed light on 'long COVID' - study  SHINE
  5. AI can detect COVID-19 from the sound of your cough  Livescience.com
  6. View Full coverage on Google News

COVID-19 Scan for Nov 06, 2020 | CIDRAP

New COVID-19 infections in England have stabilised at about 50,000 a day, the Office for National Statistics says, indicating a levelling-off in the steep ris...New COVID-19 infections in England have stabilised at about 50,000 a day, the Office for National Statistics says, indicating a levelling-off in the steep ris...

England virus cases 'about 50,000 a day' | Moree Champion | Moree, NSW

Asian ethnicity is strongly linked to COVID-related stroke, reveals an analysis of stroke centre activity in England and Scotland during the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic, and accepted for publication ...

Asian ethnicity strongly linked to COVID-related stroke

An estimated 618,700 people in private households in England had Covid-19 between October 25 and 31, the ONS said An estimated 618,700 people in private households in England had Covid-19 between October 25 and 31, the ONS said

29 reasons you're allowed to leave home in lockdown - and you won't be fined - Birmingham Live

The weekly report from the Office for National Statistics today estimated that a total 45,700 people caught Covid-19 each day last week in England, down 12% from the daily 52,000 a week earlier.The weekly report from the Office for National Statistics today estimated that a total 45,700 people caught Covid-19 each day last week in England, down 12% from the daily 52,000 a week earlier.

More proof England's second wave of Covid-19 was slowing BEFORE lockdown | Daily Mail Online

‘The infection rate has increased in recent weeks, but the rate of increase is less steep compared with previous weeks,’ says ONS‘The infection rate has increased in recent weeks, but the rate of increase is less steep compared with previous weeks,’ says ONS

Coronavirus spread ‘stabilising’ at 50,000 new daily infections, new figures suggest | The Independent

The Office for National Statistics estimated there were around 45,700 new cases per day, slightly down from the week before, as the rise in daily cases appears to have 'stabilised'The Office for National Statistics estimated there were around 45,700 new cases per day, slightly down from the week before, as the rise in daily cases appears to have 'stabilised'

Rise in new coronavirus cases in England 'appears to have stabilised' - Mirror Online

Union says fall in student Covid cases over half-term is proof schools are spreading virus Union says fall in student Covid cases over half-term is proof schools are spreading virus

Teachers no more likely than other key workers to get Covid, says ONS | Schools | The Guardian

India’s COVID-19 tally climbed to 83.64 lakh with 50,210 new cases in a day, while 77,11,809 people have recuperated so far pushing the national recovery rate to 92.20%.India’s Covid-19 tally climbed to 83.64 lakh with 50,210 new cases in a day, while 77,11,809 people have recuperated so far, pushing the national recovery rate to 92.20 per cent.

COVID-19: Scientists identify Covid patients who recover quickly, sustain antibodies

Case-control study supports COVID-19 as modifier of stroke onset, characteristics, outcomeCase-control study supports COVID-19 as modifier of stroke onset, characteristics, outcome

COVID-Related Strokes Especially Severe, Result in Worse Outcomes | MedPage Today

BOSTON, Nov 5 — Are we immune after recovering from SARS-CoV-2? This question, crucial in efforts to combat the disease and its spread, has yet to get a clear-cut answer. A team of researchers from Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital set out to investigate and found that some Covid-19 patients...BOSTON, Nov 5 — Are we immune after recovering from SARS-CoV-2? This question, crucial in efforts to combat the disease and its spread, has yet to get a clear-cut answer. A team of researchers from Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital set out to investigate and found that some Covid-19 patients...

Covid-19: Is it possible to heal quickly and retain immunity? | Life | Malay Mail

But even as more research is being conducted into how the COVID-19 infection affects the brain and central nervous system, which neurological symptoms show up in patients and what the long-term effects of such damage may be, studies focusing on just delirium as a symptom of COVID-19 are sparse. But even as more research is being conducted into how the COVID-19 infection affects the brain and central nervous system, which neurological symptoms show up in patients and what the long-term effects of such damage may be, studies focusing on just delirium as a symptom of COVID-19 are sparse.

COVID-19 Symptom: Delirium accompanied by fever could be an early sign of coronavirus disease, new study suggests - Health News , Firstpost

New infections 'appears to have stabilised in recent weeks at around 50,000 new infections per day', the ONS said.New infections 'appears to have stabilised in recent weeks at around 50,000 new infections per day', the ONS said.

Covid infections in households increase but rate has 'stabilised', ONS says | ITV News

New ONS data shows education support staff are more likely to test positive for coronavirus than teachersNew ONS data shows education support staff are more likely to test positive for coronavirus than teachers

Coronvirus: Rate of positive Covid tests among teachers revealed| Tes

Since the early days of the pandemic, the novel coronavirus has been a difficult one to self diagnose thanks to the incredibly wide range of symptoms it can cause. The disease can kick off with gastrointestinal and stomach issues, others may develop a dry cough or body aches, and some who are infected never show any signs of being sick at all. But according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Immunology and Immunotherapy, there's one unique scary symptom that can be the earliest sign you have COVID: delirium. Read on for what you should be on the lookout for, and for more on the areas that are seriously cracking down on the recent surge, check out These States Are Starting to Lock Down Again.Researchers from the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) in Barcelona reviewed an extensive body of studies and reports on COVID-19 and the effects it has on patients and major organs of the body. They found that while a majority of research has focused on how the novel coronavirus affects the lungs, heart, and kidneys, mounting evidence shows that COVID also causes neurological conditions such as "brain fog" and delirium, even in its earliest stages when accompanied by a high fever."Delirium is a state of confusion in which the person feels out of touch with reality, as if they are dreaming," Javier Correa, PhD, a researcher on the study, said in a statement. "We need to be on the alert, particularly in an epidemiological situation like this, because an individual presenting certain signs of confusion may be an indication of infection."The research also sheds light on why the virus is able to have such a strong neurological effect. "The main hypotheses which explain how the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 affects the brain point to three possible causes: hypoxia or neuronal oxygen deficiency, inflammation of brain tissue due to cytokine storm, and the fact that the virus has the ability to cross the blood-brain barrier to directly invade the brain," Correa explained.But this isn't the only symptom that can be an early sign of COVID-19. Read on to find out what else you should be looking for, according to the researchers. And for more on what could put you at risk, check out If You Live With Someone This Age, You're More Likely to Get COVID.Read the original article on Best Life. 1 FeverIt's simple but true: One of the most common indicators that you're coming down with something generally is a fever, but it also could be sign that you've contracted COVID-19. A survey from the Body Politic COVID-19 Support Group found that 48 percent of patients exhibit a fever above 100.1 degrees Fahrenheit. And for the latest COVID news delivered right to your inbox, sign up for our daily newsletter. 2 Loss of smellComing down with a common cold can sometimes cause you to lose your sense of smell thanks to stuffed up sinuses and nasal passages. But according to a study published in the journal PLoS Medicine in October, anosmia (AKA the loss of smell) is a COVID symptom that 80 percent of patients exhibit, making it a strong indicator you have coronavirus before you even get tested. And for more on how your nose knows you're sick, know that If You Can't Smell These 2 Things, You May Have COVID. 3 Loss of tasteEven though the senses of smell and taste are inextricably linked, there can be different reasons for losing one or the other. For example, your stuffy nose caused by a cold can cause you to lose your sense of taste. But the coronavirus has also been known to directly affect your ability to taste and can even lead you to lose this sense altogether. The same PLoS Medicine study found that 78 percent of those who lost their sense of taste later tested positive for COVID."Our findings show that loss of smell and taste is a highly reliable indicator that someone is likely to have COVID-19," Rachel Batterham, MD, study leader from University College London and University College London Hospitals, said in a statement. "If we are to reduce the spread of this pandemic, it should now be considered by governments globally as a criterion for self-isolation, testing, and contact tracing." And for more on this symptom, be aware that If Your Food Tastes Like This, You May Have COVID. 4 HeadacheUnfortunately, headaches are all too common for many people. But there's also a chance that the pain you're feeling could be an early indicator of COVID-19. A study published in the Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology journal in October on 509 coronavirus patients at various hospitals in the Chicago area found that nearly 38 percent of these patients experienced headaches at some point over the course of their illness. But it doesn't end there: The same study also found that having headaches as a symptom could be a reliable indicator that you could be hospitalized with the disease. And for more on what could be a sign of how severe your illness will be, check out 80 Percent of Hospitalized COVID Patients Are Deficient in This Vitamin.Since the early days of the pandemic, the novel coronavirus has been a difficult one to self diagnose thanks to the incredibly wide range of symptoms it can cause. The disease can kick off with gastrointestinal and stomach issues, others may develop a dry cough or body aches, and some who are infected never show any signs of being sick at all. But according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Immunology and Immunotherapy, there's one unique scary symptom that can be the earliest sign you have COVID: delirium. Read on for what you should be on the lookout for, and for more on the areas that are seriously cracking down on the recent surge, check out These States Are Starting to Lock Down Again.Researchers from the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) in Barcelona reviewed an extensive body of studies and reports on COVID-19 and the effects it has on patients and major organs of the body. They found that while a majority of research has focused on how the novel coronavirus affects the lungs, heart, and kidneys, mounting evidence shows that COVID also causes neurological conditions such as "brain fog" and delirium, even in its earliest stages when accompanied by a high fever."Delirium is a state of confusion in which the person feels out of touch with reality, as if they are dreaming," Javier Correa, PhD, a researcher on the study, said in a statement. "We need to be on the alert, particularly in an epidemiological situation like this, because an individual presenting certain signs of confusion may be an indication of infection."The research also sheds light on why the virus is able to have such a strong neurological effect. "The main hypotheses which explain how the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 affects the brain point to three possible causes: hypoxia or neuronal oxygen deficiency, inflammation of brain tissue due to cytokine storm, and the fact that the virus has the ability to cross the blood-brain barrier to directly invade the brain," Correa explained.But this isn't the only symptom that can be an early sign of COVID-19. Read on to find out what else you should be looking for, according to the researchers. And for more on what could put you at risk, check out If You Live With Someone This Age, You're More Likely to Get COVID.Read the original article on Best Life. 1 FeverIt's simple but true: One of the most common indicators that you're coming down with something generally is a fever, but it also could be sign that you've contracted COVID-19. A survey from the Body Politic COVID-19 Support Group found that 48 percent of patients exhibit a fever above 100.1 degrees Fahrenheit. And for the latest COVID news delivered right to your inbox, sign up for our daily newsletter. 2 Loss of smellComing down with a common cold can sometimes cause you to lose your sense of smell thanks to stuffed up sinuses and nasal passages. But according to a study published in the journal PLoS Medicine in October, anosmia (AKA the loss of smell) is a COVID symptom that 80 percent of patients exhibit, making it a strong indicator you have coronavirus before you even get tested. And for more on how your nose knows you're sick, know that If You Can't Smell These 2 Things, You May Have COVID. 3 Loss of tasteEven though the senses of smell and taste are inextricably linked, there can be different reasons for losing one or the other. For example, your stuffy nose caused by a cold can cause you to lose your sense of taste. But the coronavirus has also been known to directly affect your ability to taste and can even lead you to lose this sense altogether. The same PLoS Medicine study found that 78 percent of those who lost their sense of taste later tested positive for COVID."Our findings show that loss of smell and taste is a highly reliable indicator that someone is likely to have COVID-19," Rachel Batterham, MD, study leader from University College London and University College London Hospitals, said in a statement. "If we are to reduce the spread of this pandemic, it should now be considered by governments globally as a criterion for self-isolation, testing, and contact tracing." And for more on this symptom, be aware that If Your Food Tastes Like This, You May Have COVID. 4 HeadacheUnfortunately, headaches are all too common for many people. But there's also a chance that the pain you're feeling could be an early indicator of COVID-19. A study published in the Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology journal in October on 509 coronavirus patients at various hospitals in the Chicago area found that nearly 38 percent of these patients experienced headaches at some point over the course of their illness. But it doesn't end there: The same study also found that having headaches as a symptom could be a reliable indicator that you could be hospitalized with the disease. And for more on what could be a sign of how severe your illness will be, check out 80 Percent of Hospitalized COVID Patients Are Deficient in This Vitamin.

This Strange Symptom May Be the Earliest Sign You Have COVID, Study Says

When looking at new daily infections, the ONS said the rate across England appears to have ‘stabilised’ at around 50,000 per day.When looking at new daily infections, the ONS said the rate across England appears to have ‘stabilised’ at around 50,000 per day.

Covid-19 infection rate appears to be slowing down – ONS | Shropshire Star

There are early signs that the second wave of coronavirus may be slowing and stabilising, according to a key study tracking the UK’s Covid-19 outbreak.The Office for National Statistics (ONS)There are early signs that the second wave of coronavirus may be slowing and stabilising, according to a key study tracking the UK’s Covid-19 outbreak.The Office for National Statistics (ONS)

Older teenagers and young adults continue to have the highest positivity ratesOlder teenagers and young adults continue to have the highest positivity rates

Figures show where Covid is now worst in England and Wales - Plymouth Live

The rate of coronavirus infections across England and Wales appears to be slowing down, new data suggests. An estimated 618,700 people had coronavirus in community settings in England between October 25 and 31 - equivalent to around one in 90 people, or 1.13% of the population, the Office for NationalThe rate of coronavirus infections across England and Wales appears to be slowing down, new data suggests. An estimated 618,700 people had coronavirus in community settings in England between October 25 and 31 - equivalent to around one in 90 people, or 1.13% of the population, the Office for National

Coronavirus: COVID infection rate in England and Wales appears to be slowing down - ONS

Breaking News, Latest News and Current News from OANN.com. Breaking news and video. Latest Current News: U.S., World, Entertainment, Health, Business, Technology, Politics, Sports.

English COVID infections stabilize at around 50,000 per day: ONS estimate | One America News Network

Coronavirus UK: Data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) suggests the rate of Covid-19 infections is slowing in England and Wales.'We are seeing infections slow across England and Wales but they are still increasing.'

Spread of coronavirus slowing in England and Wales, ONS says | Metro News

Contrary to early reports of diminishing titers of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, the proteins persist for up to 6 months so far, against a backdrop of building evidence for strong T-cell responses.Contrary to early reports of diminishing titers of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, the proteins persist for up to 6 months so far, against a backdrop of building evidence for strong T-cell responses.

Waning COVID-19 Antibodies Expected, No Cause for Alarm

Investigations of deceased COVID-19 patients have shed light on possible lung damage caused by the virus. The study, published today (November 3, 2020) in The Lancet's eBioMedicine, by King's College London in collaboration with University of Trieste and the International Centre for Genetic Engin

Investigations of Deceased COVID-19 Patients Reveal Lung Damage Caused by Persistence of “Abnormal Cells”

Investigations of deceased COVID-19 patients have shed light on possible lung damage caused by the virus.

COVID-19 lung damage caused by persistence of 'abnormal cells'

Autopsies performed on people who died from Covid-19 have revealed 'peculiar and unexpected' lung damage caused by SARS-CoV-2.Autopsies performed on people who died from Covid-19 have revealed 'peculiar and unexpected' lung damage caused by SARS-CoV-2. The new study, reported in t

"Peculiar And Unexpected" Lung Damage Found In The Autopsies Of Covid-19 Patients | IFLScience

According to the researchers, previous studies had provided conflicting accounts about whether people recovering quickly from the viral infection can According to the researchers, previous studies had provided conflicting accounts about whether people recovering quickly from the viral infection can

Scientists identify COVID-19 patients who recover quickly, sustain antibodies - Times of India

US research into persistent antibody response may cast light on immunityUS research into persistent antibody response may cast light on immunity

Covid-19: Study finds some patients ‘clear’ virus faster

A study of the lungs of people who have died from COVID-19 has found persistent and extensive lung damage in most cases and may help doctors ...A study of the lungs of people who have died from COVID-19 has found persistent and extensive lung damage in most cases and may help doctors ...

Lung damage found in COVID-19 dead may shed light on 'long COVID': Study - CNA

Severe coronavirus is 'likely the consequence of abnormal cells persisting for long periods inside the lungs'.Severe coronavirus is 'likely the consequence of abnormal cells persisting for long periods inside the lungs'.

Coronavirus victims have 'profound lung disruption'

The researchers, including those from King's College London in the UK, examined lung, heart, liver, and kidney samples of 41 patients who died of COVID-19 to examine the behaviour of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.The researchers, including those from King's College London in the UK, examined lung, heart, liver, and kidney samples of 41 patients who died of COVID-19 to examine the behaviour of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.

COVID-19 lung damage caused by persistence of ‘abnormal cells’, say scientists | coronavirus outbreak News,The Indian Express

The researchers, including those from King's College London in the UK, examined lung, heart, liver, and kidney samples of 41 patients who died of COVID-19 to examine the behaviour of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.The researchers, including those from King's College London in the UK, examined lung, heart, liver, and kidney samples of 41 patients who died of COVID-19 to examine the behaviour of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.

COVID-19 lung damage caused by persistence of ‘abnormal cells’, say scientists | coronavirus outbreak News,The Indian Express

In what could explain why some patients suffer from long Covid-induced lung problems.In what could explain why some patients suffer from long Covid-induced lung problems.

Why Covid patients suffer from fatigue, lack of breath for long | Sambad English

London: In what could explain why some patients suffer from long COVID-induced lung problems, a new investigation of deceased patients has shed light on possible lung damage caused by the novel coronavirus. The study shows the unique characteristics to the SARS-CoV-2 virus and may explain why patients suffer from ‘long COVID’ and experience the effects […]

This is exactly why COVID-19 patients suffer from fatigue, lack of breath for long - OrissaPOST

A new study where researchers looked at the lungs of deceased COVID-19 patients may shed light on why some may suffer from so-called "long COVID."A new study where researchers looked at the lungs of deceased COVID-19 patients may shed light on why some may suffer from so-called "long COVID."

The team discovered “really vast destruction of the architecture of the lungs”, with healthy tissue “almost completely substituted by scar tissue”.The team discovered “really vast destruction of the architecture of the lungs”, with healthy tissue “almost completely substituted by scar tissue”.

Coronavirus | Lung damage in COVID-19 dead may shed light on ‘long COVID’: study - The Hindu

A study of the lungs of people who have died from COVID-19 has found persistent and extensive lung damage in most cases and may help doctors understand what is behind a syndrome known as long COVID, in which patients suffer ongoing symptoms for months.A study of the lungs of people who have died from COVID-19 has found persistent and extensive lung damage in most cases and may help doctors understand what is behind a syndrome known as 'long COVID', in which patients suffer ongoing symptoms for months.

Lung damage found in COVID dead may shed light on 'long COVID': Study - Health - The Jakarta Post

Lung damage in dead could help explain why some suffer from 'long COVID'A study of the lungs of people who have died from COVID-19 has found persistent and extensive lung damage in most cases and may help doctors understand what is behind a syndrome...

Lung damage in dead could help explain why some suffer from 'long COVID' | Daily Sabah

A small proportion of people who have recovered can experience a range of ongoing symptoms, including fatigue and brain fog.. Read more at straitstimes.com.Europe News -A small proportion of people who have recovered can experience a range of ongoing symptoms, including fatigue and brain fog.. Read more at straitstimes.com.

Lung damage found in Covid-19 fatal cases may shed light on 'long Covid' syndrome: Study, Europe News & Top Stories - The Straits Times

A study of the lungs of people who have died from COVID-19 has found persistent and extensive lung d

Lung damage found in COVID dead may shed light on 'long COVID' - study - SHINE News

The researchers, including those from King’s College London in the UK, examined lung, heart, liver, and kidney samples of 41 patients who died of Covid-19 to examine the behaviour of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.The researchers, including those from King’s College London in the UK, examined lung, heart, liver, and kidney samples of 41 patients who died of Covid-19 to examine the behaviour of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.

Covid lung damage caused by persistence of ‘abnormal cells’, say scientists - health - Hindustan Times

A study of the lungs of people who have died from COVID-19 has found persistent and extensive lung damage in most cases and may help doctors understand what is behind a syndrome known as 'long COVID', in which patients suffer ongoing symptoms for months.A study of the lungs of people who have died from COVID-19 has found persistent and extensive lung damage in most cases and may help doctors understand what is behind a syndrome known as 'long COVID', in which patients suffer ongoing symptoms for months.

Lung damage found in COVID dead may shed light on 'long COVID' - study | Reuters

'Even if someone recovers from Covid, the damage that is done could be massive''Even if someone recovers from Covid, the damage that is done could be massive'

Lung damage found in dead coronavirus patients may shed light on 'long Covid'

The rate of coronavirus infections across England and Wales is beginning to show signs of levelling off, new data suggests. The rate of coronavirus infections across England and Wales is beginning to show signs of levelling off, new data suggests.

Covid infection rate slowing in England and Wales, but still rising - ONS - LBC

LONDON - A study of the lungs of people who have died from Covid-19 has found persistent and extensive lung damage in most cases and may help doctors understand what is behind a syndrome known as ‘long Covid’, in which patients suffer ongoing symptoms for months. Scientists leading the research said they also found some unique characteristics of SARS-CoV-2, the... LONDON - A study of the lungs of people who have died from Covid-19 has found persistent and extensive lung damage in most cases and may help doctors understand what is behind a syndrome known as ‘long Covid’, in which patients suffer ongoing symptoms for months. Scientists leading the research said they also found some unique characteristics of SARS-CoV-2, the...

Lung damage found in Covid dead may shed light on 'long Covid': Study, World News - AsiaOne