1. Reducing the airborne transmission risk for SARS-CoV-2  News-Medical.Net
  2. Surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic  The Lancet
  3. Woman sheds coronavirus for 70 days without symptoms  Livescience.com
  4. Data analysis identifies the 'mother' of all SARS-CoV-2 genomes  Medical Xpress
  5. SARS-CoV-2 uses 'genome origami' to infect and replicate inside host cells  Phys.org
  6. View Full coverage on Google News
Rapid Reviews: COVID-19 (RR:C19), an open-access overlay journal published by the MIT Press that accelerates peer review of COVID-19-related research preprints, is currently soliciting reviews of the following COVID-19 preprints.Rapid Reviews: COVID-19 (RR:C19), an open-access overlay journal published by the MIT Press that accelerates peer review of COVID-19-related research preprints, is currently soliciting reviews of the following COVID-19 preprints.

Reducing the airborne transmission risk for SARS-CoV-2

The woman was immunocompromised but never developed symptoms of COVID-19. The woman was immunocompromised but never developed symptoms of COVID-19.

Woman with COVID-19 sheds infectious virus for a record 70 days | Live Science

In the field of molecular epidemiology, the worldwide scientific community has been sleuthing to solve the riddle of the early history of SARS-CoV-2.

Data analysis identifies the 'mother' of all SARS-CoV-2 genomes

Scientists at the University of Cambridge, in collaboration with Justus-Liebig University, Germany, have uncovered how the genome of SARS-CoV-2—the coronavirus that causes COVID-19—uses genome origami ...

SARS-CoV-2 uses 'genome origami' to infect and replicate inside host cells

Many efforts to develop therapies against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) are focused on the spike (S) protein trimer that binds to the host receptor. Structures of trimeric S protein show its receptor-binding domain in either an up or a down conformation. Toelzer et al. produced SARS-CoV-2 S in insect cells and determined the structure by cryo–electron microscopy. In their dataset, the closed form was predominant and was stabilized by binding linoleic acid, an essential fatty acid. A similar binding pocket appears to be present in previous highly pathogenic coronaviruses, and past studies suggested links between viral infection and fatty acid metabolism. The pocket could be exploited to develop inhibitors that trap S protein in the closed conformation. Science , this issue p. [725][1] Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), represents a global crisis. Key to SARS-CoV-2 therapeutic development is unraveling the mechanisms that drive high infectivity, broad tissue tropism, and severe pathology. Our 2.85-angstrom cryo–electron microscopy structure of SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) glycoprotein reveals that the receptor binding domains tightly bind the essential free fatty acid linoleic acid (LA) in three composite binding pockets. A similar pocket also appears to be present in the highly pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). LA binding stabilizes a locked S conformation, resulting in reduced angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) interaction in vitro . In human cells, LA supplementation synergizes with the COVID-19 drug remdesivir, suppressing SARS-CoV-2 replication. Our structure directly links LA and S, setting the stage for intervention strategies that target LA binding by SARS-CoV-2. [1]: /lookup/doi/10.1126/science.abd3255

Free fatty acid binding pocket in the locked structure of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein | Science

If there's one thing we know about SARS-CoV-2, is that its effects on people vary. A lot. As the pandemic rolls on, this coronavirus continues to bring new surprises.If there's one thing we know about SARS-CoV-2, is that its effects on people vary. A lot. As the pandemic rolls on, this coronavirus continues to bring new surprises.

Startling Case Study Finds Asymptomatic COVID-19 Carrier Who Shed Virus For 70 Days

A US virologist claimed that the COVID-19 attack the immune system, wreaking havoc like no other virus he’s studied before.SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, rewires the alarm system that cells use to warn others about infection, say US researchers.

This is how COVID-19 virus attacks our immune system

Unusually small antibodies found in the blood of llamas are the inspiration behind one of the latest weapons against Covid-19. Scientists have identified aUnusually small antibodies found in the blood of llamas are the inspiration behind one of the latest weapons against Covid-19. Scientists have identified a

Synthetic Mini-Antibody Inspired By Llama Blood Could Combat SARS-CoV-2 | IFLScience

SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, taps into human proteases such as furin to enter cells. Temporarily inhibiting those enzymes might stymy infection.SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, taps into human proteases such as furin to enter cells. Temporarily inhibiting those enzymes might stymy infection.

Scientists Probe Blockers for the Coronavirus Spike Protein | The Scientist Magazine®

The majority of people infected with SARS-CoV-2 appear to actively shed infectious virus for about 8 days, but there is a wide range of variability from person to person. Understanding how long people ...

Case study details leukemia patient who shed infectious SARS-CoV-2 for at least 70 days

Researchers discovered a COVID-19 patient who shed the novel coronavirus for 70 days without showing any symptoms during the period. The patient suffered from a form of leukemia, which might explain why the immune system could not mount a proper response that would have cleared the virus.Researchers discovered a COVID-19 patient who shed the novel coronavirus for 70 days without showing any symptoms during the period. The patient suffered from a form of leukemia, which might explai…

Startling discovery reveals an asymptomatic coronavirus patient was contagious for 70 days – BGR

That is good newsThat is good news

Teed up - The T-cell immune response to covid lasts at least six months | Science & technology | The Economist

Most SARS-CoV-2 virus strains worldwide have a genetic mutation that boosts transmission strength but doesn't interfere with the potential efficacy of therapies and vaccines in development.Most SARS-CoV-2 virus strains worldwide have a genetic mutation that boosts transmission strength but doesn't interfere with the potential efficacy of therapies and vaccines in development.

Common SARS-CoV-2 Mutation May Be Making COVID More Contagious

Extremely small antibodies, known as nanobodies, have been shown to neutralize SARS-CoV-2. But they're extracted from llamas and camels, which is problematic for a number of reasons. Now, scientists have identified a synthetic form of a nanobody, known as a sybody, which shows affinity to SARS-CoV-2 and neutralizing capabilities.

Synthetic Mini-Antibody Binds to and Neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 | Technology Networks

Specific T-cell immunity to virus critical in curbing infections, re-infectionsSpecific T-cell immunity to virus critical in curbing infections, re-infections

Burn, COVID, burn: SARS-CoV-2 immunity still present 6 months after infection, says study | World – Gulf News

The ability of SARS-CoV-2 to infect cells depends on interactions between the viral spike protein and the human cell surface protein ACE2. To enable the virus to hook onto the cell surface, the spike ...

Scientists identify synthetic mini-antibody to combat COVID-19

A woman in the U.S. never developed any symptoms of COVID-19 even though the novel coronavirus was in her system for at least 15 weeks, according to a new case study.A woman in the U.S. never developed any symptoms of COVID-19 even though the novel coronavirus was in her system for at least 15 weeks, according to a new case study.

This woman had the coronavirus for at least 105 days but never showed any symptoms | CTV News

A person with leukemia who tested positive for the novel coronavirus but had no symptoms was still infectious 70 days later, new research has found.A person with leukemia who tested positive for the novel coronavirus but had no symptoms was still infectious 70 days later, new research has found.

COVID contagion lasted 70 days in asymptomatic patient - New York Daily News

A 71-year-old cancer patient who tested positive for the novel coronavirus but never showed symptoms shed the infectious disease for 70 days, according to a case study.A 71-year-old cancer patient who tested positive for the novel coronavirus but never showed symptoms shed the infectious disease for 70 days, according to a case study.

The ongoing study at Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (OUH) showed that virus antibodies last longer in people who had symptoms and fade quicker in asymptomatic people.The ongoing study at Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (OUH) showed that virus antibodies last longer in people who had symptoms and fade quicker in asymptomatic people.

Covid-19 antibodies drop by HALF just three months after infection | Daily Mail Online

Nanobodies, small antibodies found in camels and llamas, are promising as tools against viruses due to their high stability and small size - Articles from The Weather Channel | weather.comNanobodies, small antibodies found in camels and llamas, are promising as tools against viruses due to their high stability and small size - Articles from The Weather Channel | weather.com

A leukemia patient shed infection of COVID-19 for at least 70 days.A leukemia patient shed infection of COVID-19 for at least 70 days.

Coronavirus patient spread SARS-CoV-2 for 70 days, study says - Deseret News

Researcher have identified synthetic mini-antibodies to combat COVID-19 in a scientific breakthrough. The SARS-CoV-2 infects cells through interactions between the viral spike protein and the human cell surface protein ACE2. A research group searched various existing libraries to find best sybodies that could possibly block SARS-CoV-2 from infecting human cells.

Synthetic mini-antibody to combat COVID-19 identified?