1. Lobsters stranded at airport amid Australia-China trade dispute  NEWS.com.au
  2. Lobsters may be victim of China trade spat  The Canberra Times
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Australian lobsters have been stranded on the tarmac at a Chinese airport prompting fears seafood could become the next victim of escalating trade tensions.Australian lobsters have been stranded on the tarmac at a Chinese airport prompting fears seafood could become the next victim of escalating trade tensions.

Australia-China relations: Lobsters stranded at airport amid trade dispute

The threat of Australian lobsters dying at Chinese airports has spooked local producers and escalated trade tensions between Beijing and Canberra.The threat of Australian lobsters dying at Chinese airports has spooked local producers and escalated trade tensions between Beijing and Canberra.

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Lobsters appear to be the latest victims of escalating trade tensions between Australia and China. Tonnes of live Australian rock lobsters have been left on t...Lobsters appear to be the latest victims of escalating trade tensions between Australia and China. Tonnes of live Australian rock lobsters have been left on t...

Lobsters may be victim of China trade spat | The Canberra Times | Canberra, ACT

Agriculture Minister David Littleproud has raised concerns over custom clearance issues flagged by China regarding Australian lobster exports as Australia appears to have been “singled out” on the issue. Tonnes of Australian lobsters have been stranded on the ground in China in the latest blow to trade relations between the two nations, with any further delay placing the exports at risk of spoiling. Concerns are also mounting more generally over the future of Australia’s $700 million a year lobster export industry. Mr Littleproud told Sky News he was working with his own industry, DFAT and Beijing officials to resolve the matter as quickly as possible, but warned there were “serious concerns” about the incident. “They are effectively saying that they wish to test up to 50 per cent of rock lobsters that come in for heavy metals,” he said. “Now we can test quite clearly that there is already arrangements within Australia to do testing to make sure the product we send is the highest class in the world. “There is no other nation that is exporting rock lobster into China that has been asked to do this.” Mr Littleproud said while he had written to his Chinese counterpart in recent weeks – regarding rumours the Chinese government were encouraging importers to avoid Australian cotton mills – no response had yet been received. He said he and Trade Minister Simon Birmingham were committed to pursuing clarification from, and communication with, China. “My door is always open and my phone is always on,” the minister said. “The best way to deal with any misunderstanding or any disagreement is to have dialogue but there has to be someone who has the maturity, they have the leadership to put their hand out first. “We’d like to continue on with the relationship and the arrangements we’ve had but obviously our producers will look to other markets into the future if it becomes too tricky.” Agriculture Minister David Littleproud has raised concerns over custom clearance issues flagged by China regarding Australian lobster exports as Australia appears to have been “singled out” on the issue. Tonnes of Australian lobsters have been stranded on the ground in China in the latest blow to trade relations between the two nations, with any further delay placing the exports at risk of spoiling. Concerns are also mounting more generally over the future of Australia’s $700 million a year lobster export industry. Mr Littleproud told Sky News he was working with his own industry, DFAT and Beijing officials to resolve the matter as quickly as possible, but warned there were “serious concerns” about the incident. “They are effectively saying that they wish to test up to 50 per cent of rock lobsters that come in for heavy metals,” he said. “Now we can test quite clearly that there is already arrangements within Australia to do testing to make sure the product we send is the highest class in the world. “There is no other nation that is exporting rock lobster into China that has been asked to do this.” Mr Littleproud said while he had written to his Chinese counterpart in recent weeks – regarding rumours the Chinese government were encouraging importers to avoid Australian cotton mills – no response had yet been received. He said he and Trade Minister Simon Birmingham were committed to pursuing clarification from, and communication with, China. “My door is always open and my phone is always on,” the minister said. “The best way to deal with any misunderstanding or any disagreement is to have dialogue but there has to be someone who has the maturity, they have the leadership to put their hand out first. “We’d like to continue on with the relationship and the arrangements we’ve had but obviously our producers will look to other markets into the future if it becomes too tricky.”

Australia's ongoing trade tensions with China may have just claimed another victim.Australia's ongoing trade tensions with China may have claimed another victim.

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There are fears Australian lobster exporters have become the latest victims of trade tensions with China.

China trade tensions: Australian lobster exports held up

SYDNEY -- Shipments of Australian lobster to China have encountered customs delays in recent days, a government-industry body hereSeafood faces tougher inspections at time of rising bilateral tensions

Australian lobster held up in Chinese customs: trade group - Nikkei Asia