1. New Technique Looks for Dark Matter Traces in Dark Places  Mirage News
  2. Another twist in the dark matter story  Cosmos
  3. Scientists use the Milky Way to hunt for dark matter  Space.com
  4. Researchers look for dark matter close to home  Phys.org
  5. Milky Way Dark Matter Signals in Doubt after Controversial New Papers  Scientific American
  6. View Full coverage on Google News
In this composite image, theorized particles of decaying dark matter should produce a spherical halo of X-ray emission - represented here as colorized...In this composite image, theorized particles of decaying dark matter should produce a spherical halo of X-ray emission - represented here as colorized...

New Technique Looks for Dark Matter Traces in Dark Places | Mirage News

Electromagnetic signals don’t provide the evidence physicists were hoping for, new study suggests.Electromagnetic signals don’t provide the evidence physicists were hoping for, new study suggests.

Another twist in the dark matter story | Cosmos

Scientists studying a mysterious signal from far-off galaxies didn't find dark matter as they'd hoped. But the inventive new technique they used to detect this strange signal, which uses our own galaxy to hunt for dark matter, could elevate the hunt for the elusive material.

Scientists use the Milky Way to hunt for dark matter | Space

Eighty-five percent of the universe is composed of dark matter, but we don't know what, exactly, it is.

Researchers look for dark matter close to home

“New paper! The Milky Way's rotation curve with superfluid dark matter https://t.co/EJydh0ZuZt”

Sabine Hossenfelder on Twitter: "New paper! The Milky Way's rotation curve with superfluid dark matter https://t.co/EJydh0ZuZt"

New analyses question whether mysterious gamma-ray and x-ray light in the galaxy actually stems from an invisible massNew analyses question whether mysterious gamma-ray and x-ray light in the galaxy actually stems from an invisible mass

Milky Way Dark Matter Signals in Doubt after Controversial New Papers - Scientific American

Eighty-five percent of the universe is composed of dark matter, but we don't know what, exactly, it is. A new study from the University of Michigan, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and University of California, Berkeley has ruled out dark matter being responsible for mysterio

Dark Matter Decay Ruled Out as Source of Mysterious Electromagnetic Signals Detected From Nearby Galaxies

Dark Matter Decay Ruled Out as Source of Mysterious Electromagnetic Signals Detected From Nearby Galaxies