1. Children produce a different antibody response to SARS-CoV-2, finds study  Drug Target Review
  2. Children Produce Weaker Coronavirus Antibodies, Study Finds  The New York Times
  3. Novel inhalable llama antibodies may help treat, prevent Covid-19: Study  Deccan Herald
  4. How a llama and Pitt's lab produced a promising new treatment for Covid-19  Pittsburgh Business Times
  5. Llama nanobodies could be a powerful weapon against COVID-19  Medical Xpress
  6. View Full coverage on Google News
A new analysis reveals that the course of SARS-CoV-2 infection and the immune response it provokes is different in adults and children.A new analysis reveals that the course of SARS-CoV-2 infection and the immune …

Children produce a different antibody response to SARS-CoV-2, finds study

The research suggests that children clear the infection much faster than adults and may help explain why many don’t become seriously ill.The research suggests that children clear the infection much faster than adults and may help explain why many don’t become seriously ill.

Researchers discovered a COVID-19 patient who shed the novel coronavirus for 70 days without showing any symptoms during the period. The patient suffered from a form of leukemia, which might explain why the immune system could not mount a proper response that would have cleared the virus.Researchers discovered a COVID-19 patient who shed the novel coronavirus for 70 days without showing any symptoms during the period. The patient suffered from a form of leukemia, which might explai…

Startling discovery reveals an asymptomatic coronavirus patient was contagious for 70 days – BGR

Scientists have found a new method to extract tiny but extremely powerful novel coronavirus antibody fragments from llamas, which they say could be fashioned into inhalable therapeutics with the potential to prevent and treat Covid-19. These special llama antibodies, called nanobodies, are much smaller than human antibodies, according to the researchers from the University ofScientists have found a new method to extract tiny but extremely powerful novel coronavirus antibody fragments from llamas, which they say could be fashioned into inhalable therapeutics with the

Novel inhalable llama antibodies may help treat, prevent Covid-19: Study | Deccan Herald

A new study from the University of Pittsburgh found the nanobodies were many times more effective at neutralizing the virus and were able to save one million cells from being infected.A new study from the University of Pittsburgh found the nanobodies were many times more effective at neutralizing the virus and were able to save one million cells from being infected.

Llamas make tiny 'nanobodies' that are 'many times more powerful' than human coronavirus antibodies | Daily Mail Online

Llamas could be the new key to helping humans fight the coronavirus. According to the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, medical researchers have discovered a way to extract “tiny but extremely powerful SARS-CoV-2 antibody...Llamas could be the new key to helping humans fight the coronavirus. According to the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, medical researchers have discovered a way to extract “tiny but extremely powerful SARS-CoV-2 antibody fragments from llamas." KDKA's Amy Wadas has the details.

Pitt Researchers Discover Llama 'Nanobodies' Are Powerful New Coronavirus Treatment – News, Sports, Weather, Traffic and the Best of Pittsburgh

Today in Science, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine describe a new method to extract tiny but extremely powerful SARS-CoV-2 antibody fragments from llamas, which could be fashioned into inhalable therapeutics with the potential to prevent and treat COVID-19.Today in Science, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine describe a new method to extract tiny but extremely powerful SARS-CoV-2 antibody fragments from llamas, which could be fashioned into inhalable therapeutics with the potential to prevent and treat COVID-19.

Llama nanobodies could be a powerful weapon against COVID-19 | EurekAlert! Science News

The study revealed that the unique characteristics of the SARS-CoV-2 virus and may explain why patients suffer from 'long COVID'.India’s COVID-19 tally climbed to 83.64 lakh with 50,210 new cases in a day, while 77,11,809 people have recuperated so far pushing the national recovery rate to 92.20%.

Coronavirus: Here's why COVID-19 patients are suffering from breathing issues

Children and adults produce different types and amounts of antibodies in response to infection with the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, a new study from researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons has found.Children and adults produce different types and amounts of antibodies in response to infection with the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, a new study from researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons has found.

Children produce different antibodies in response to infection with new coronavirus

According to the study, understanding how long people can remain actively infected is important since it provides new details about Covid that are still not well understood.According to the study, understanding how long people can remain actively infected is important since it provides new details about Covid that are still not well understood.

US Cancer Patient Carried Coronavirus For 105 Days With No Symptoms: Study

Children and adults produce different types and amounts of antibodies in response to infection with the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, a new study from researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College ...

Children produce different antibodies in response to SARS-CoV-2

BOSTON, Nov 5 — Are we immune after recovering from SARS-CoV-2? This question, crucial in efforts to combat the disease and its spread, has yet to get a clear-cut answer. A team of researchers from Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital set out to investigate and found that some Covid-19 patients...BOSTON, Nov 5 — Are we immune after recovering from SARS-CoV-2? This question, crucial in efforts to combat the disease and its spread, has yet to get a clear-cut answer. A team of researchers from Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital set out to investigate and found that some Covid-19 patients...

Covid-19: Is it possible to heal quickly and retain immunity? | Life | Malay Mail

Special llama antibodies called nanobodies is the most effective way to fight COVID-19, so far. On Thursday, the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Special llama antibodies called nanobodies is the most effective way to fight COVID-19, so far. On Thursday, the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine hosted an online news conference to discuss the research published in “Science” magazine that describes a new method to extract tiny, but extremely powerful SARS-CoV-2 antibody fragments from llamas, which could […]

Llama Nanobodies Most Potent Weapon To Fight COVID | News, Sports, Jobs - Post Journal

Researchers from Columbia University say the findings could explain why children tend to experience less severe infection than adults Researchers from Columbia University say the findings could explain why children tend to experience less severe infection than adults

Coronavirus: Children and adults produce different antibodies in response to SARS-CoV-2 - Mirror Online

Contrary to early reports of diminishing titers of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, the proteins persist for up to 6 months so far, against a backdrop of building evidence for strong T-cell responses.Contrary to early reports of diminishing titers of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, the proteins persist for up to 6 months so far, against a backdrop of building evidence for strong T-cell responses.

Waning COVID-19 Antibodies Expected, No Cause for Alarm

The beginning of the COVID pandemic marked the end of many daily habits and routines that suddenly became too unsafe to keep up. Even now, eight months in, there are many places that are only slowly opening back up. But if you're going about life as usual in one facet in particular, you could be putting yourself at risk. According to a new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there's one thing you may be doing every day that doubles your chances of catching COVID: going into the office to work. Read on to find out more on the new research, and for further insight into just how easy it is to come down with coronavirus, check out You Can Catch COVID From Someone in Exactly This Long, CDC Says.For the new study, which was released in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, researchers looked at a sample of 314 employed adults over the age of 18 who received COVID-19 tests at outpatient facilities in July. Results showed that people who worked full or part-time off-site via teleworking were almost half as likely to test positive for the virus than those who reported going into an office or school setting over the course of the workweek."This investigation provides evidence of the potential health benefits of teleworking associated with the COVID-19 pandemic," the study's authors write. "Allowing and encouraging the option to work from home or telework, when possible, is an important consideration for reducing SARS-CoV-2 transmission."The study's authors also pointed out that socioeconomic differences played a major factor in who was able to work remotely, finding that non-white employees who made less money were less likely to have the option to work from home. The researchers also recommended beefing up on-site health measures in cases where employees had to come to work, such as wearing masks and limiting face time with other employees, to help mitigate the spread in workplaces.But the office isn't the only place where you could be putting yourself at an increased risk for COVID-19. Read on for other venues that could get you sick. And for more on how the outbreak is looking in your neck of the woods, check out Here's How Much Worse COVID Is Getting in Your State.Read the original article on Best Life. 4 Houses of worshipCongregating to worship is an important activity for many, but because it tends to involve bringing a large crowd together indoors and can often incorporate singing and talking, religious gatherings are also considered a high-risk environment for coronavirus transmission. An earlier CDC report noted a difference between how many people with positive COVID tests had gone to a religious gathering (7.8 percent) versus the number of people with negative COVID tests who had done the same (5 percent). And for more on everyday places that could get you sick, check out Chances Are High Your Grocery Store Clerk Has Silent COVID, Study Says. 3 GymsUnfortunately, the heavy breathing and poor ventilation in gyms make them a particularly risky venue for catching coronavirus, with the same CDC report finding that 7.8 percent of people who tested positive had been to the gym in the past two weeks, while just 6.3 percent of those who tested negative had. And for more regular COVID news, sign up for our daily newsletter. 2 Bars, coffee shops, or cafésWhen times get as hard as they have been during the pandemic, sometimes you just want to go where everybody knows your name and enjoy a drink at your local watering hole with friends. But health officials have singled out bars (and coffee shops to a lesser degree) for being high-risk spaces due to the fact that patrons can't drink while wearing face masks. Bars are also usually indoors and crowded, and they lend themselves to talking loudly, which sends more droplets flying into the air.In the CDC study, 8.5 percent of people whose tests came back positive had been to a bar in the two weeks prior, compared to 5 percent of subjects with negative test results. And for more on how to avoid getting sick, check out This One Thing Is Better at Protecting You From COVID Than Your Mask. 1 RestaurantsEven as some states have continued to reopen dining rooms and increase their capacity, it's become increasingly clear that restaurants represent a significant risk of spreading COVID. The CDC study found that those who tested positive for COVID were twice as likely to have eaten out two weeks before symptom onset as those who tested negative, including at restaurants with outdoor and patio dining. And for information on the place you're most likely to contract the virus, check out These Are Your Chances of Getting COVID If Someone in Your Home Has It.The beginning of the COVID pandemic marked the end of many daily habits and routines that suddenly became too unsafe to keep up. Even now, eight months in, there are many places that are only slowly opening back up. But if you're going about life as usual in one facet in particular, you could be putting yourself at risk. According to a new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there's one thing you may be doing every day that doubles your chances of catching COVID: going into the office to work. Read on to find out more on the new research, and for further insight into just how easy it is to come down with coronavirus, check out You Can Catch COVID From Someone in Exactly This Long, CDC Says.For the new study, which was released in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, researchers looked at a sample of 314 employed adults over the age of 18 who received COVID-19 tests at outpatient facilities in July. Results showed that people who worked full or part-time off-site via teleworking were almost half as likely to test positive for the virus than those who reported going into an office or school setting over the course of the workweek."This investigation provides evidence of the potential health benefits of teleworking associated with the COVID-19 pandemic," the study's authors write. "Allowing and encouraging the option to work from home or telework, when possible, is an important consideration for reducing SARS-CoV-2 transmission."The study's authors also pointed out that socioeconomic differences played a major factor in who was able to work remotely, finding that non-white employees who made less money were less likely to have the option to work from home. The researchers also recommended beefing up on-site health measures in cases where employees had to come to work, such as wearing masks and limiting face time with other employees, to help mitigate the spread in workplaces.But the office isn't the only place where you could be putting yourself at an increased risk for COVID-19. Read on for other venues that could get you sick. And for more on how the outbreak is looking in your neck of the woods, check out Here's How Much Worse COVID Is Getting in Your State.Read the original article on Best Life. 4 Houses of worshipCongregating to worship is an important activity for many, but because it tends to involve bringing a large crowd together indoors and can often incorporate singing and talking, religious gatherings are also considered a high-risk environment for coronavirus transmission. An earlier CDC report noted a difference between how many people with positive COVID tests had gone to a religious gathering (7.8 percent) versus the number of people with negative COVID tests who had done the same (5 percent). And for more on everyday places that could get you sick, check out Chances Are High Your Grocery Store Clerk Has Silent COVID, Study Says. 3 GymsUnfortunately, the heavy breathing and poor ventilation in gyms make them a particularly risky venue for catching coronavirus, with the same CDC report finding that 7.8 percent of people who tested positive had been to the gym in the past two weeks, while just 6.3 percent of those who tested negative had. And for more regular COVID news, sign up for our daily newsletter. 2 Bars, coffee shops, or cafésWhen times get as hard as they have been during the pandemic, sometimes you just want to go where everybody knows your name and enjoy a drink at your local watering hole with friends. But health officials have singled out bars (and coffee shops to a lesser degree) for being high-risk spaces due to the fact that patrons can't drink while wearing face masks. Bars are also usually indoors and crowded, and they lend themselves to talking loudly, which sends more droplets flying into the air.In the CDC study, 8.5 percent of people whose tests came back positive had been to a bar in the two weeks prior, compared to 5 percent of subjects with negative test results. And for more on how to avoid getting sick, check out This One Thing Is Better at Protecting You From COVID Than Your Mask. 1 RestaurantsEven as some states have continued to reopen dining rooms and increase their capacity, it's become increasingly clear that restaurants represent a significant risk of spreading COVID. The CDC study found that those who tested positive for COVID were twice as likely to have eaten out two weeks before symptom onset as those who tested negative, including at restaurants with outdoor and patio dining. And for information on the place you're most likely to contract the virus, check out These Are Your Chances of Getting COVID If Someone in Your Home Has It.

Going Here Every Day Doubles Your Chances of Catching COVID, CDC Says

All 41 patients had extensive lung damage, while 36 had massive abnormal clotting.All 41 patients had extensive lung damage, while 36 had massive abnormal clotting.

Postmortem lungs of COVID-19 patients show massive damage | CIDRAP

A 71-year-old coronavirus patient in the US was contagious for more than two months even as she showed no symptoms of the Covid-19 infection. The woman was also suffering from cancer which had weakened her immune system. The case contradicts the guidelines of the CDC, which say that "immunocompromised" Covid-19 patients are likely not infectious after 20 days.A 71-year-old coronavirus patient in the US was contagious for more than two months even as she showed no symptoms of the Covid-19 infection. The woman was also suffering from cancer which had weakened her immune system. The case contradicts the guidelines of the CDC, which say that "immunocompromised" Covid-19 patients are likely not infectious after 20 days.

Asymptomatic coronavirus patient in US remains contagious for 70 days, contradicting CDC findings - Coronavirus Outbreak News

People who tested positive for COVID-19 during a recent study were much more likely to have reported to an office setting before infection than telecommuted from home, officials said Thursday.People who tested positive for COVID-19 during a recent study were much more likely to have reported to an office setting before infection than telecommuted from home, officials said Thursday.

Workers with COVID more likely report to office than telework - New York Daily News

Healthcare workers are vigilant about personal protective equipment (PPE), hand hygiene, and disinfection efforts in the hospital when managing COVID-19 patients. Too often, though, they let their guard down when they get home.Healthcare workers are vigilant about personal protective equipment (PPE), hand hygiene, and disinfection efforts in the hospital when managing COVID-19 patients. Too often, though, they let their guard down when they get home.

House Too Often a Home for COVID-19 Infection | Infection Control Today

Researchers are sounding the alarm about an extraordinary case in which a leukemia patient who became infected with Covid-19 shed infectious viral particles for 70 days without presenting any symptoms.Researchers are sounding the alarm about an extraordinary case in which a leukemia patient who became infected with Covid-19 shed infectious viral particles for 70 days without presenting any symptoms.

Frightening research finds asymptomatic Covid-19 carrier who shed virus particles for 70 days — RT World News

Although measures have been set in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19, a new study from the CDC MMWR Weekly says working adults are more likely to catch the virus versus those who stay at home.Experts recommend if you can't work from home, you should stay far away from others in the workplace

New study finds working adults more likely to catch covid than those teleworking | abc13.com

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Different "forms of disease" identified in mild Covid-19 cases; many difficult decisions have had to be made quickly; and what a US study found on household transmission.Different "forms of disease" identified in mild Covid-19 cases; many difficult decisions have had to be made quickly; and what a US study found on household transmission.

Coronavirus morning recap: Covid ethics, forms of disease in mild cases, and household transmission | Health24

CUMBERLAND — COVID-19 cases rapidly grew Thursday as the virus made its way into various local and state communities.CUMBERLAND — COVID-19 cases rapidly grew Thursday as the virus made its way into various local and state communities.

Local COVID-19 news includes athletics, firefighters, church and llama named Wally | Local News | times-news.com

While most people infected with the novel coronavirus actively shed the pathogen for about eight days, scientists have reported an unusual case of a blood cancer patient who carried the virus for about 105 days, “and remained infectious for at least 70,” without experiencing any symptoms...While most people infected with the novel coronavirus actively shed the pathogen for about eight days, scientists have reported an unusual case of a blood cancer patient who carried the virus for about 105 days, “and remained infectious for at least 70,” without experiencing any symptoms the entire time.

Covid-19 | Cancer patient carried coronavirus for 105 days without symptoms: Case study - health - Hindustan Times

The case contradicts the COVID-19 guidelines issued by America’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that state that immunocompromised coronavirus patients are not likely to remain infectious after 20 days. The case contradicts the COVID-19 guidelines issued by America’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that state that immunocompromised coronavirus patients are not likely to remain infectious after 20 days.

Asymptomatic COVID-19 patient in US carried virus for over 70 days

Autopsies performed on people who died from Covid-19 have revealed 'peculiar and unexpected' lung damage caused by SARS-CoV-2.Autopsies performed on people who died from Covid-19 have revealed 'peculiar and unexpected' lung damage caused by SARS-CoV-2. The new study, reported in t

"Peculiar And Unexpected" Lung Damage Found In The Autopsies Of Covid-19 Patients | IFLScience

LONDON – A study of the lungs of people who have died from COVID-19 has found persistent and extensive lung damage in most cases and may help doctors understand what is behind a syndrome known as “long COVID,” in which patients suffer ongoing symptoms for months. Scientists leading the research said they also found some […]

Lung damage found in COVID dead may shed light on 'long COVID': study - The Market Mail

US research into persistent antibody response may cast light on immunityUS research into persistent antibody response may cast light on immunity

Covid-19: Study finds some patients ‘clear’ virus faster

“Llama Llama’s Red Pajamas” might be a beloved children’s story, but researchers at the University of Pittsburgh say the animals could help humans battle COVID-19.“Llama Llama’s Red Pajamas” might be a beloved children’s story, but researchers at the University of Pittsburgh say the animals could help humans battle COVID-19.

Llamas and COVID-19: a match that could lead to a breakthrough

A new study where researchers looked at the lungs of deceased COVID-19 patients may shed light on why some may suffer from so-called "long COVID."A new study where researchers looked at the lungs of deceased COVID-19 patients may shed light on why some may suffer from so-called "long COVID."

Pitt researchers announced Thursday a “major” scientific breakthrough involving llama nanobodies that they say could lead to a powerful weapon against COVID-19. Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine say they’ve found a new way to extract tiny but extremely powerful SARS-CoV-2 antibodies from llamas which could be used to make inhalable therapeutics that could potentially prevent and treat COVID-19. SARS-CoV-2 is the name of the virus that causes COVID-19.Pitt researchers announced Thursday a “major” scientific breakthrough involving llama nanobodies that they say could lead to a powerful weapon against COVID-19. Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine say they’ve found a new way to extract tiny but extremely powerful SARS-CoV-2 antibodies from llamas which could be used to make inhalable therapeutics that could potentially prevent and treat COVID-19. SARS-CoV-2 is the name of the virus that causes COVID-19.

Pitt scientists unveil potential 'powerful' treatment for COVID-19 using llama nanobodies | WJAC

Pitt scientists unveil potential 'powerful' treatment for COVID-19 using llama nanobodies

Covid-19 persists in lung tissueCovid-19 persists in lung tissue

Covid-19 persists in lung tissue

These small cousins of antibodies are being studied for possible use in humans.These small cousins of antibodies are being studied for possible use in humans.

Llama 'nanobodies’ may yield COVID-19 treatment, Pitt scientists say

Investigations of deceased COVID-19 patients have shed light on possible lung damage caused by the virus. The study, published today (November 3, 2020) in The Lancet's eBioMedicine, by King's College London in collaboration with University of Trieste and the International Centre for Genetic Engin

Investigations of Deceased COVID-19 Patients Reveal Lung Damage Caused by Persistence of “Abnormal Cells”

Investigations of deceased COVID-19 patients have shed light on possible lung damage caused by the virus.

COVID-19 lung damage caused by persistence of 'abnormal cells'

As per the researchers, previous studies had provided conflicting accounts about whether people recovering quickly from the viral infection can sustain potentially-protective antibodies or notAs per the researchers, previous studies had provided conflicting accounts about whether people recovering quickly from the viral infection can sustain potentially-protective antibodies or not

Scientists identify Covid-19 patients who recover quickly, sustain antibodies

The researchers, including those from King's College London in the UK, examined lung, heart, liver, and kidney samples of 41 patients who died of COVID-19 to examine the behaviour of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.The researchers, including those from King's College London in the UK, examined lung, heart, liver, and kidney samples of 41 patients who died of COVID-19 to examine the behaviour of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.

COVID-19 lung damage caused by persistence of ‘abnormal cells’, say scientists | coronavirus outbreak News,The Indian Express

The researchers, including those from King's College London in the UK, examined lung, heart, liver, and kidney samples of 41 patients who died of COVID-19 to examine the behaviour of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.The researchers, including those from King's College London in the UK, examined lung, heart, liver, and kidney samples of 41 patients who died of COVID-19 to examine the behaviour of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.

COVID-19 lung damage caused by persistence of ‘abnormal cells’, say scientists | coronavirus outbreak News,The Indian Express

A study of the lungs of people who have died from COVID-19 has found persistent and extensive lung damage in most cases and may help doctors ...A study of the lungs of people who have died from COVID-19 has found persistent and extensive lung damage in most cases and may help doctors ...

Lung damage found in COVID-19 dead may shed light on 'long COVID': Study - CNA

London: In what could explain why some patients suffer from long COVID-induced lung problems, a new investigation of deceased patients has shed light on possible lung damage caused by the novel coronavirus. The study shows the unique characteristics to the SARS-CoV-2 virus and may explain why patients suffer from ‘long COVID’ and experience the effects […]

This is exactly why COVID-19 patients suffer from fatigue, lack of breath for long - OrissaPOST

Individuals who develop Covid-19 end up infecting around half of their household members with SARS-CoV-2, a US study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has found.Individuals who develop Covid-19 end up infecting around half of their household members with SARS-CoV-2, a US study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has found.

Coronavirus household transmission much higher than previously thought, new study suggests | Witness